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Orca Calf Confirmed

On Wednesday, the Center for Whale Research announced the discovery of a new southern resident orca calf, “L125″. This is the first calf in two years for the L Pod, and the forth calf borne by its mother L86, who is now 30-years old. The calf was spotted in Haro Strait.

Researchers said the calf was in good physical condition and appeared to be about 1.5 months old. Whale watchers are cautiously optimistic–about half of orca calves die within the first year and the orca population is declining.

CBRA has shared some photos and videos of recent orca sightings by Cadboro Bay residents in this post, a reminder of the incredible wildlife in this area and the importance of protecting them.

CTV News has featured a spotlight on the new orca that can be viewed here.

Photo Credit: Dave Ellifrit, Center for Whale Research.

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Orcas near Cadboro Bay

The Cadboro Bay coastline has been the site of multiple Orca sightings. The dramatic video footage below was captured by a local resident, from their deck overlooking Haro Strait.

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) Canada encourages reporting of Orca and other Cetacean sightings (link).  Due to their declining population status, an understanding of their distribution and abundance is crucial to conservation efforts.

Recent declines in the killer whale population are linked to threats such as toxic pollution, and noise and disturbance from boat traffic. Killer whales also fundamentally rely on healthy populations of salmon – particularly Chinook – which are declining across the Salish Sea. Learn more about orcas, and DFO’s protection measures here.

Another local resident provided photos of the Transient Biggs orcas (captured through a zoom lens), as they were heading toward Sidney through Haro Strait. Other marine mammals recognize Biggs Killer Whales as a feared predator.

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Orcas near Cadboro Bay

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The Cadboro Bay coastline has been the site of multiple Orca sightings in recent days. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) Canada encourages reporting of Orca and other Cetacean sightings (link). 

Due to their declining population status, an understanding of their distribution and abundance is crucial to conservation efforts.

image

Recent declines in the killer whale population are linked to threats such as toxic pollution, and noise and disturbance from boat traffic. Killer whales also fundamentally rely on healthy populations of salmon – particularly Chinook – which are declining across the Salish Sea. Learn more about orcas, and DFO’s protection measures here.